Aug 27, 2014
deerbearwolf:

Deer Bear Wolf Magazine Issue 2 has arrived!

Make sure to stop by DBW Issue #2 party at Mammal Gallery! I have a story in this issue :)

deerbearwolf:

Deer Bear Wolf Magazine Issue 2 has arrived!

Make sure to stop by DBW Issue #2 party at Mammal Gallery! I have a story in this issue :)

Aug 27, 2014

One more day!

After almost-volcano eruptions and other life things, we got one more day before vacation.

I have yet to pack but I’m quickly finishing some work/deadlines today so I can leave my laptop behind for some 12 days.

Beyond excited.

Aug 26, 2014
This little lady is one! Happy Birthday, Alta. 🎉🐾🎈

This little lady is one! Happy Birthday, Alta. 🎉🐾🎈

Aug 25, 2014
Aug 25, 2014
Aug 25, 2014
How do we reconcile the imperfections of feminism with all the good it can do? In truth, feminism is flawed because it is a movement powered by people and people are inherently flawed. For whatever reason, we hold feminism to an unreasonable standard where the movement must be everything we want and must always make the best choices. When feminism falls short of our expectations, we decide the problem is with feminism rather than with the flawed people who act in the name of the movement…
Roxane Gay, Bad Feminist. (via megwhat)
Aug 25, 2014
schwamommy:

downtown. afternoon breakwalk. #vscocam (at living walls, zacharevic install)

schwamommy:

downtown. afternoon breakwalk. #vscocam (at living walls, zacharevic install)

Aug 25, 2014

jasontravisphoto:

This past weekend #WeLoveAtl wheatpasted the 45x45 project for Art on the Beltline in association with The Inside Out Project. 45 photographers made portraits of residents from each of the 45 neighborhoods connected by the Atlanta Beltline. Couldn’t have happened without the help of Living Walls volunteers. So happy I could be a part of the documentation as well as a contributor (my portrait of Sunni, representing the Poncey-Highland neighborhood is on the top row, 6th from right). Stay tuned for more process photos!

Aug 24, 2014

Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.

One of the entries from the list ‘20 Things Everyone Thinks About the Food World (But Nobody Will Say)’. (via crankyskirt)

This.

(via megwhat)

Aug 24, 2014

(Source: crispyimage, via simplycasual)

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About

I'm Muriel — a writer living in Atlanta.

Portfolio / Travel Blog
For Atlanta arts stuff, check out CommonCreativ ATL.

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